• Petroleum & Coal journalInstructions for Authors

    Instructions for Authors

    Submitting your Article

    Authors should first examine a recent issue of Petroleum and Coal for guidance with respect to current editorial practice. Careful preparation of the text and illustration faciliate rapid publication.  Margins of at least 3 cm should be all around each sheet. The text should be left justified but right unjustified. After a manuscript has been accepted for publication and after all revisions have been incorporated, the manuscript should be submitted to the Editorial Office via e-mail.   It is important to observe the following guidelines:

    • Ensure that only the revelant files are as attachemnt of e-mail.

    • It is important how you display titles, heading, etc., as long as you do it in the same way throughout the manuscript.

    • Please, do not incorporate any figures or schemes into the text file; instead, treat them as separate files.

    • Please  send a complete manuscript by e-mail as an attachment. In this case it is very important to send all figures and schemes as separate files. The author will receive a notification that all parts of the manuscript are readable or, if there are any problems, a request to send the manuscript by the ordinary mail.

    Manuscript  and all other correspondence should be addressed to:

    e-mail: jozef.mikulec@vurup.sk

    address:
    Jozef Mikulec, Editor-in-Chief
    VÚRUP, a. s.
    Vlčie hrdlo
    P.O.BOX 50
    820 03 Bratislava 23
    Slovak Republic

    To prepare the Petroleum and Coal article

    The manuscript should be assembled in the following order: title page, key words, abstract, introduction, experimental part (including materials, methods and/or computational procedures and programs), results, discussion (including conclusions), list of symbols, acknowledgement (optional), references, tables, figures and figure captions, schemes, formulae. Results and discussion may be combined into a single section. Pages should be numbered consecutively from the beginning (title page) to the end (graphic abstract).When references concerning related papers are quoted by the author and such papers are not available to the referees because they are in press or submitted to another journal, one copy of such work must be included with the manuscript for the use of the referees and Editor.

    Title

    It is important that the title of the manuscript reflects concisely the purpose and results of the investigation in order to provide maximum information for a computerised title search. All non-functional words should be deleted from the title. The title should be followed by the authors’ first names, initials of middle names, last names, as well as the addresses including e-mail addresses of all the authors. The name of the author to whom inquiries should be directed may be marked with an asterisk.

    Key Words

    For all types of manuscripts, about five key words, which best characterize the paper, should be given. For guidance, consult Chemical Abstracts General Subject Index. The key words form the basis of the annual Subject Index.

    Abstract

    Every paper must be accompanied by an abstract (no heading, one paragraph only). The summary should clearly and briefly present the main object and results of the paper (100-200 words are usually adequate). The summary should be comprehensible without reading the paper. Abbreviations and reference citations should be avoided. Names or partial names of compounds should be accompanied by their numbers but the use of compound numbers alone is discouraged.

    Introduction

    The introduction (no heading) should state briefly, with relevant references, the purpose of the investigation and its relation to other work in the appropriate field. All relevant citations should be included.

    Experimental

    In the experimental section materials, methods and procedures should be described in this order, in sufficient detail to enable other chemists to repeat the experiments. The instruments used as well as measurement conditions and corresponding physical units should appear in a paragraph at the beginning of the Experimental section. Description of standard techniques applicable throughout the work should follow the paragraph on instrumentation.

    Results and Discussion

    Usually, the results are presented first, followed by a discussion of their significance. Only strictly relevant results should be given. The section may be further divided by subheadings. Equations, tables and figures should be used to shorten the text and make it readily understandable. Data should not be presented in duplicate.

    Symbols

    If a number of symbols are used in the text and in equations, it is advisable to assemble the definitions and units of all symbols in a special section on a separate page of the manuscript.

    References

    Bibliographic references should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they appear in the text (including tables and figure captions) by superscript numbers at the appropriate place. The list of references should be typed double-spaced on a separate page.

    Here are some other useful guidelines concerning references.

    The Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index (CASSI) is our guide to abbreviations of periodical titles; the abbreviation is often found at the top of a journal page in the citation. When unsure of an abbreviated title, please spell it out in full.

    If the author is unknown, list the reference by company, agency, or journal source.

    Give all appropriate information: all authors’ last names, followed by first initials; book title, journal, or meeting name; meeting location and date; publisher and location; year of publication; volume and issue number; first page of the article; volume and chapter number; book series name; paper or report number. Indicate whether the reference is in a language other than English.

    List references as “in press” only if they have been formally accepted for publication; give the author’s name and the title of the publication.

    “Unpublished results” or “personal communication” is not appropriate in a list of cited literature and should appear in text with the first initial(s) and last name(s), followed by the source (e.g., “M. Jones and Y. Lee, unpublished observations”).

    Here are some models, followed by the type of source:

    • Kipketer FM. Petroleum catalysts. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1982; 36(6): 627-635. (Journal with volume and issue number.)

    • Johnson GK. J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., May 1993, p. 5. (Journal with no volume number; use month instead.)

    • Redwine SP. The Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2nd ed.; Praeger, T., Ed.; Elsevier: New York, 1979; Vol. 2, Chapter 5; p. 59. (Book with edition number, volume, and chapter.)

    • Bush BC. U.S. Patent 6 471 932, 1961. (Patent number, United States. Abbreviate Eur., Jap., Ger., Br.)

    • Dresdner FC. Presented at the 22nd International Petroleum Conference, Paris, France, August 1962. (Unpublished presentation.)

    • Borscht, I. Abstracts of Papers; 173rd ACS Meeting, Boise, MS, August 1993; Chemistry Society: Independence, MO, 1973 Vol. 61. (Abstract of paper presented at a meeting.)

    You are responsible for the accuracy of your references.

    Preparation of the Manuscript – Detailed Information

    Physical Units and Their Symbols

    SI quantities, units and symbols should be used as much as is reasonably possible. A more detailed list of units and symbols with specific application to chemistry is given in the IUPAC Manual of Symbols and Terminology for Physicochemical Quantities and Units. Non-SI units must be explained unless their definition is obvious.

    Abbreviations

    Abbreviations and acronyms should agree with international (preferably Chemical Abstracts version) usage. Apart from common abbreviations the authors are free to abbreviate frequently mentioned terms. However, such abbreviations should be explained, either when they first appear in the text, or in Symbols.

    Nomenclature

    All nomenclature and terminology should be consistent, clear and unambiguous. It is the author’s responsibility to provide correct names and terms. The Index Guide of Chemical Abstracts should be consulted as an additional guideline.

    Mathematical and Chemical Equations

    Authors are requested to type all mathematical and chemical symbols, equations and formulae. If these must be hand-written, please write clearly in ink (do not use a ball-point pen). All equations should be designated with Arabic numerals in parentheses. Distinction must be made between such ambiguous symbols as the letter l and the numeral one, the letter O and the numeral zero.

    Formulae and Schemes

    Structural formulae, including schemes, must be drawn on a separate sheet. The location where the formulae are to be printed should be marked in the typed manuscript. Formulae should be numbered with bold Arabic numerals (in parentheses if they follow the complete names of the compounds). It might be more comprehensible to describe the compounds by their functional class names (e.g., ketone 7) than by their formula numbers only.Formulae in plain text should be numbered consecutively.

    Figures

    The number of figures should be kept as small as possible. Colour figures can be printed provided that, in the specific judgement of the Editor, the colour is essential to convey scientific information. The charges will be given upon request. Figures must be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals. Please indicate in the corner of each figure, in soft pencil, the number of the figure and the last name of the first author. Drawings must be in black ink on a smooth white paper. Good quality photo copies are also acceptable. The curves should be drawn in slightly heavier line than the axes. The lines should be thick enough and the symbols big enough to allow photographic reduction to printing size (5.5 cm base). Each figure must be accompanied by a short legend typed on a separate page attached to the manuscript. Computer-plotted drawings must satisfy the same criteria.

    Tables

    Tabulation of experimental results is encouraged whenever leading to more effective presentation. However, duplication of information contained in tables and figures should be avoided. Tables should be typed on separate sheets and their position in the text should be indicated. Tables should be numbered consecutively with Roman numerals.